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Hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid-HIDA scan

HIDA scan is an imaging procedure that helps your doctor track the production and flow of bile from your liver to your small intestine. Bile is a fluid produced by your liver that helps your digestive system break down fats in the foods you eat. A HIDA scan, which stands for hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid scan, creates pictures of your liver, gallbladder, biliary tract and small intestine. A HIDA scan can also be called cholescintigraphy, hepatobiliary scintigraphy or hepatobiliary scan. A HIDA scan is a type of imaging study called a nuclear medicine scan. This means the HIDA scan uses a radioactive chemical or tracer that helps highlight certain organs on the scan.

It is done for,

Your doctor may order a HIDA scan to track the flow of bile from your liver to your small intestine, and also to evaluate your gallbladder. This may help in the diagnosis of several diseases and conditions, such as:

  • Bile duct obstruction
  • Bile leakage
  • Congenital abnormalities in the bile ducts
  • Gallbladder inflammation (cholecystitis)
  • Gallstones

Your doctor may use a HIDA scan as part of a test to measure the rate at which bile is released from your gallbladder (gallbladder ejection fraction).

 Procedure:

You’ll be asked to change into a gown before your HIDA scan begins. Your health care team will position you on a table, usually on your back. A medication is then injected into a vein in your arm. The medication contains a radioactive tracer that travels through your bloodstream to your liver, where it’s taken up by the bile-producing cells. The radioactive tracer travels with the bile from your liver, into your gallbladder and through your bile ducts to your small intestine. You may feel some pressure while the radioactive tracer is injected into your vein.

As you lie on the table, a special gamma camera passes back and forth over your abdomen taking pictures of the tracer as it moves through your body. Each picture takes about a minute. The gamma camera takes pictures continuously for about an hour. You’ll need to keep still during the HIDA scan. This can become uncomfortable, but you may find that you can lessen the discomfort by taking deep breaths and thinking about other things. Tell your health care team if you’re uncomfortable. The doctor watches the scan’s progress on a monitor as the radioactive tracer moves through your body.

The HIDA scan stops when the doctor sees the radioactive tracer entering your small intestine. This typically takes an hour. If your doctor doesn’t see the radioactive tracer in your small intestine, you may receive a medication and undergo more scans later in the day.


 

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