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How to keep your Eyes Healthy

Don’t take your eyes for granted.

When you’re seeing well and have no irritation, it’s easy to forget about going to the eye doctor. But preventing eye disease is so important—often, if you wait until you notice a problem, it can be too late. Luckily, there are plenty of simple things you can do each day to keep your sight in good shape. Here are some easy ways to be proactive about your eye health.

1. Eat for Good Vision

Protecting your eyes starts with the food on your plate. Nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids, lutein, zinc, and vitamins C and E might help ward off age-related vision problems such as macular degeneration and cataracts, studies show. Dark leafy greens like spinach, kale and Brussels sprouts, as well as dark berries, like blueberries and blackberries, are rich in lutein, a type of carotenoid that protects against macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in people over 60. Foods rich in omega-3s, like walnuts and fresh cold-water fish, have been found to reduce inflammation in the blood vessels of the eye.

2. Maintain a healthy weight

Eating a well-balanced diet also helps you maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight or obese increases your risk of developing diabetes and other systemic conditions, which can lead to vision loss, such as diabetic eye disease or glaucoma. Remember diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults. If you are having trouble maintaining a healthy weight, talk to your doctor.

3. Quit smoking or never start. 

Smoking is as bad for your eyes as it is for the rest of your body. Research has linked smoking to an increased risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, cataract, and optic nerve damage, all of which can lead to blindness. If you’ve tried to quit smoking before and started smoking again, keep trying. The more times you try to quit smoking, the more likely you are to succeed.

4. Be cool and wear your shades. 

Sunglasses are a great fashion accessory, but their most important job is to protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. The right kind of sunglasses will help protect your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays.Too much UV exposure makes you more likely to get cataracts and macular degeneration.

Choose sunglasses that block 99% to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays. Wraparound lenses help protect your eyes from the side. Polarized lenses reduce glare when driving.

If you wear contact lenses, some offer UV protection. It’s still a good idea to wear sunglasses for more protection, though.

5. Clean your hands and your contact lenses properly. 

To avoid the risk of infection, always wash your hands thoroughly before putting in or taking out your contact lenses. Make sure to disinfect contact lenses as instructed and replace them as appropriate.

6. Replace Your Contact Lens Case Every Two to Three Months

A huge reason why people with contact lenses experience complications is that they don’t clean their lens cases. People throw them into their pockets or purses or store them in a humid bathroom, which is a breeding ground for bacteria. So replace your case often and keep it in a clean, dry place. After you put in your contacts, be sure that the case is empty of all solution: Dump it out, then rinse and dry the case before you store your lenses in it again.

7. Use Safety Eyewear

If you work with hazardous or airborne materials on the job or at home or you play certain sports such as ice hockey, racquetball, and lacrosse which can lead to an eye injury, wear protective eyewear. Protective eyewear includes safety glasses and goggles, safety shields, and eye guards specially designed to provide the correct protection for a certain activity. Most protective eyewear lenses are made of polycarbonate, which is 10 times stronger than other plastics. Many eye care providers sell protective eyewear, as do some sporting goods stores.

8. Control the Air Quality in Your Home or Office

In the winter, the heating systems in homes and offices create dry air. Consider using a portable humidifier to keep the air moist, which will help prevent eye irritation caused by dryness.

9. Protect from Pet shedding & dander

If you have a pet, keeping their hair off areas where you sit or lie down, like couches and chairs, is important as well. Along with shedding dander, pets can also track in other irritants from outside that can cause inflammation in the eyes.

10. Drink Caffeine—but Not Too Much

Two servings of a caffeinated beverage daily are good for protecting against dry eyes (this helps us produce tears, which keep the eyes moist). But keep in mind that more than two servings can deplete your tear film and dry out your eyes, which can contribute to irritation.

11. Protect Your Eyes as You Would Protect Your Skin

Every time you lather on sunscreen, think about shielding your eyes from the sun as well. A lifetime of UV light exposure can contribute to cataracts and macular degeneration, so always wear sunglasses with 100 percent UVA and UVB protection. And since, by the time you hit age 18, you’ve already received 80 percent of the UV light that you’ll be exposed to in a lifetime, it’s crucial to protect your children’s eyes as well.

12. Give your eyes a rest.

If you spend a lot of time at the computer or focusing on any one thing like reading, you sometimes forget to blink and your eyes can get fatigued.

Use the 20-20-20 rule to let your eyes rest: Every 20 minutes, look 20 feet away or more for at least 20 seconds. It helps break the eyes’ constant strain of focusing from doing close work, like reading or looking at a computer monitor. And always be sure that you’re a comfortable arm’s distance away from what you’re looking at or reading. Another reason to give your eyes a break is when we concentrate, whether it’s on reading or on the computer, we blink about half as many times as we do when we aren’t concentrating. Blinking is how we bring fresh tears to the corneal surface, which helps your eyes stay moist and free of irritants. So the more we concentrate, the drier our eyes become.

13. Exercise

Exercise improves blood circulation, which improves oxygen levels to the eyes and the removal of toxins.

14. Travel Smart

Airplane air quality tends to be drier and more irritating to the eye, especially if you’re a contact lens wearer, Using rewetting or lubricating drops in your eyes before boarding (keep the bottle handy during the flight too) is a smart way to prevent irritation caused by dry eyes. Bring along an extra pair of lenses and your glasses, just in case. And while you’re on vacation, it’s never a good idea to expose contact lenses to pool or hot tub water, which is full of irritating chemicals and bacteria that can cause infections.

15. Include Saline Solution in your Home Medical Kit

When pouring chemicals or using power tools, you should always wear safety goggles. But that level of protection isn’t necessary around the house, so if you accidentally splash soap or cleansers in your eye, the first thing you should do is rinse thoroughly with saline for 10 to 15 minutes. That may seem like a long time, but rinsing is the best way to clear the eyes. If you still experience irritation after that, visit your eye doctor.

16. Visit Your Eye Doctor Regularly

Everyone, even young children, should get their eyes examined regularly. It helps you protect your sight and see your best.
Eye exams can also find some eye diseases, such as glaucoma, that have no symptoms. It’s important to find these diseases early on, when they’re easier to treat.
Depending on your eye health needs, you can see either an optometrist or an ophthalmologist for an eye exam. Ophthalmologists are medical doctors who specialize in eye care. They can provide general eye care, treat eye diseases, and perform eye surgery. Optometrists have had 4 years of specialized training after college. They provide general eye care and treat the most common eye diseases. They don’t do eye surgery.

 

 

Structure of Eye

Get Regular Eye Exams 

Foods to improve Your Eye Health

Have a Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exam

Eye safety tips from computer screen

Common Vision Problems

 

Age-related Eye Diseases

 

 

 

 

Related Topics

How to choose sunglasses

Kinds of Contact Lenses

Some interesting Eye Facts


 

Reference

http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/features/tips-for-healthy-eyes#3

https://nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyehealthtips

http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/eyes.html#

http://www.allaboutvision.com/nutrition/foods.htm

http://www.bausch.com/vision-and-age/20s-and-30s-eyes/healthy-eyes

http://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/optic-nerve

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_eye

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=10609

http://www.aao.org/eye-health/tips-prevention/top-sunglasses-tips

http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/contact-lenses/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-various-types-of-contact-lenses?sso=y

http://www.everydayhealth.com/vision-center/lenses-and-beyond/contact-lens-options.aspx

https://www.reference.com/science/big-human-eye-59a54b764d3ea21e#

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