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Stages of breast cancer

 

  • Stage 0: This stage is used to describe non-invasive breast cancer. There is no evidence of cancer cells breaking out of the part of the breast in which it started, or of getting through to or invading neighboring normal tissue. LCIS and DCIS are examples of stage 0.
  • Stage IA (1A): This stage describes invasive breast cancer (cancer cells are breaking through to or invading neighboring normal tissue) in which the tumor measures up to 2 centimeters and no lymph nodes are involved.
  • Stage IB (1B): This stage describes invasive breast cancer (cancer cells are breaking through to or invading neighboring normal tissue) in which there is no tumor but small groups of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes, OR there is a tumor in the breast that is no larger than 2 centimeters and there are small groups of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) in the lymph nodes.
  • Stage IIA (2A): This stage describes invasive breast cancer in which no tumor can be found in the breast but cancer cells are found in the axillary lymph nodes (the lymph nodes under the arm), OR the tumor measures at least 2 centimeters but not more than 5 centimeters and has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes, OR the tumor measures 2 centimeters or less and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes.
  • Stage IIB (2B): This stage describes invasive breast cancer in which the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but no larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes, OR the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters but has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.
  • Stage IIIA (3A): This stage describes invasive breast cancer in which there is no tumor but cancer is found in axillary lymph nodes which have clumped together or to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone, OR the tumor is 5 centimeters or smaller and has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, OR the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters and has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures.
  • Stage IIIB (3B): This stage describes invasive breast cancer in which a tumor of any size has spread to the skin of the breast and/or the chest wall, AND the cancer may have spread to axillary lymph nodes that are clumped together or sticking to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone. Inflammatory breast cancer is also considered at least stage IIIB.
  • Stage IIIC (3C): This stage describes invasive breast cancer in which there may be no sign of cancer in the breast or, if there is a tumor, it is any size and may have spread to the skin of the breast and/or the chest wall, AND the cancer has spread to lymph nodes above or below the collarbone, AND the cancer may have spread to axillary lymph nodes or to lymph nodes near the breastbone.
  • Stage IV (4): This stage includes invasive breast cancer in which cancer cells have spread beyond the breast, underarm, and internal mammary lymph nodes and may have spread to the supraclavicular lymph nodes (nodes located at the base of the neck, above the collarbone), lungs, liver, bone, or brain. “Metastatic at presentation” means that the breast cancer has spread beyond the breast and nearby lymph nodes, even though this is the first diagnosis of breast cancer. The reason for this is that the primary breast cancer was not found when it was only inside the breast. Stage IV is metastatic cancer.

 

How different are the cancer cells from normal cells?

How big is the cancer?

Is there lymph node involvement?

What is the cancer’s hormone receptor status?

What is the cancer’s HER2 status?

Additional tests

New laboratory tests

 


Treatment & Stages of male breast cancer

Coping and support for male breast cancer


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

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