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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation-CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR): First aidcpr-pic-3

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique useful in many emergencies, including heart attack or near drowning, in which someone’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped. The American Heart Association recommends that everyone — untrained bystanders and medical personnel alike — begin CPR with chest compressions.

It’s far better to do something than to do nothing at all if you’re fearful that your knowledge or abilities aren’t 100 percent complete. Remember, the difference between your doing something and doing nothing could be someone’s life.

 

Here’s advice from the American Heart Association:

  • Untrained. If you’re not trained in CPR, then provide hands-only CPR. That means uninterrupted chest compressions of about 100 a minute until paramedics arrive (described in more detail below). You don’t need to try rescue breathing.
  • Trained and ready to go. If you’re well-trained and confident in your ability, begin with chest compressions instead of first checking the airway and doing rescue breathing. Start CPR with 30 chest compressions before checking the airway and giving rescue breaths.
  • Trained but rusty. If you’ve previously received CPR training but you’re not confident in your abilities, then just do chest compressions at a rate of about 100 a minute. (Details described below.)

The above advice applies to adults, children and infants needing CPR, but not newborns.

CPR can keep oxygenated blood flowing to the brain and other vital organs until more definitive medical treatment can restore a normal heart rhythm.

When the heart stops, the lack of oxygenated blood can cause brain damage in only a few minutes. A person may die within eight to 10 minutes.

To learn CPR properly, take an accredited first-aid training course, including CPR and how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED). If you are untrained and have immediate access to a phone, call your local emergency/rescue number before beginning CPR. The dispatcher can instruct you in the proper procedures until help arrives.

How to do CPR

Hands-Only CPR

Infant and Child CPR

Complications of CPR

Pet CPR

 

 

Related Topics

Choking Rescue Procedure DRSABCD First Aid Method


What is AED

 


Disclosure: The content in this article does not constitute, nor is meant to constitute, professional advice of any kind. If you require professional advice in relation to any medical matter you should consult an appropriate professional. doctoryouneed.com is an informational website dedicated to giving useful information to its readers. 


Refrences

http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-cpr/basics/art-20056600

http://depts.washington.edu/learncpr/comp.html

http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/cpr/perfoming-cpr/hands-only-cpr

http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/cpr/perfoming-cpr/cpr-steps

http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/cpr/perfoming-cpr/child-baby-cpr

http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/cpr/perfoming-cpr/pet-cpr

http://www.sja.org.uk/sja/first-aid-advice/first-aid-for-parents/unresponsive-not-breathing/baby.aspx

http://www.sja.org.uk/sja/first-aid-advice/first-aid-for-parents/unresponsive-not-breathing/child.aspx

http://www.petmd.com/dog/emergency/common-emergencies/e_dg_cardiopulmonary_resuscitation

http://depts.washington.edu/learncpr/cat_dog.html

 

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