728x90

Ebola Treatment

Standard treatment for Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is still limited to supportive therapy. Supportive therapy is balancing the patient’s fluid and electrolytes, maintaining their oxygen status and blood pressure, and treating such patients for any complicating infections. Any patients suspected of having Ebola hemorrhagic fever should be isolated, and caregivers should wear protective garments. Currently, there is no specific medical treatment for Ebola Virus Disease (EVD).

The CDC recommends following medical treatments for Ebola-infected patients:

Symptoms of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) are treated as they appear. When used early, basic interventions can significantly improve the chances of survival. These include:

  • Providing fluids and electrolytes (body salts) through infusion into the vein (intravenously).
  • Offering oxygen therapy to maintain oxygen status.
  • Using medication to support blood pressure, reduce vomiting and diarrhea and to manage fever and pain.
  • Treating other infections, if they occur.

Recovery from EVD depends on good supportive care and the patient’s immune response. Those who do recover develop antibodies that can last 10 years, possibly longer. It is not known if people who recover are immune for life or if they can later become infected with a different species of Ebola virus. Some survivors may have long-term complications, such as joint and vision problems.

Antiviral Drugs

There is currently no antiviral drug licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat EVD in people. Drugs that are being developed to treat EVD work by stopping the virus from making copies of itself.

Blood transfusions from survivors and mechanical filtering of blood from patients are also being explored as possible treatments for EVD.

Supportive care – rehydration with oral or intravenous fluids – and treatment of specific symptoms improves survival. There is as yet no proven treatment available for EVD. However, a range of potential treatments including blood products, immune therapies and drug therapies are currently being evaluated.

In the ongoing 2018-2019 Ebola outbreak in DRC, the first-ever multi-drug randomized control trial is being conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of drugs used in the treatment of Ebola patients under an ethical framework developed in consultation with experts in the field and the DRC.

Health care professionals who treat Ebola Virus Disease (EVD)

Because Ebola infections can spread rapidly to others and because patients can easily infect health care workers, the CDC and other agencies recommend that only highly trained personnel treat Ebola patients. This treatment involves high-level barrier techniques to protect all health care professionals (hospital care workers, nurses, doctors, lab technicians, janitors, and hospital infectious-disease-control personnel). Unfortunately, these trained individuals and resources are often not available in the Ebola high-risk areas. Ideally, individuals diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S. should be treated in specific designated treatment centers and treatment monitored by the CDC. Types of specialists who may treat Ebola-infected patients are emergency medicine specialists, infectious disease specialists, critical care doctors and nurses, pulmonologists, hematologists, hospitalists, and hospital infection-control personnel.

Health care professionals transport patients diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S. to special hospitals certified to treat Ebola patients. (Contact the CDC immediately for information for experimental vaccines, treatment protocols, and patient care and/or transfer to an appropriate facility.) The special hospitals were certified because of the problems experienced in a Texas hospital where the first patient in the U.S. was diagnosed with Ebola and subsequently spread the disease to hospital workers. Experimental medical treatments of Ebola infections include immune serum, antiviral drugs, possible blood transfusions, and supportive care in an intensive care hospital facility approved by the CDC to treat Ebola infections.

Healthcare workers need to avoid contact with the bodily fluids of their infected patients by taking strict precautions, such as wearing protective equipment.

Ebola virus disease is sometimes fatal. The sooner a person is given care, the better the chance they’ll survive.

 

 

man-carrying-child-Ebola-Overview man-painting-ebola-symptoms
blood-test-lab-ebola-causes patient-ebola-complication
lab-test-ebola-diagnosis man-injection-ebola-vaccination
biohazard-dress-ebola-prevention patient-nurse-drip-ebola-risk-factor
girl-medical-checkup-exposed-ebola biohazard-dress-spray-ebola-transmission
patient-drip-recovery-ebola facts-about-ebola

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


References:

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ebola-virus-disease

https://www.medicinenet.com/ebola_hemorrhagic_fever_ebola_hf/article.htm#what_is_the_medical_treatment_for_ebola_hemorrhagic_fever

https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/treatment/index.html

https://www.medicinenet.com/ebola_hemorrhagic_fever_ebola_hf/article.htm#what_types_of_health_care_professionals_treat_ebola_hemorrhagic_fever

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/ebola/

 

728x90