728x90

Topics Under: Surgery for Male Breast Cancer

Written instructions after Surgery

These instructions should include, about care after surgery are usually given to you and your caregivers.

  • The care of the surgical wound and dressing
  • How to monitor drainage and take care of the drains
  • How to recognize signs of infection
  • Bathing and showering after surgery
  • When to call the doctor or nurse
  • When to begin using the arm and how to do arm exercises to prevent stiffness
  • What to eat and not to eat
  • Use of medicines, including pain medicines and possibly antibiotics
  • Any activity restrictions
  • What to expect regarding sensations or numbness in the breast and arm
  • When to see your doctor for a follow-up appointment

 

Most patients see their surgeon within 7 to 14 days after the surgery. Your surgeon should explain the results of your pathology report at this visit and talk to you about the need for further treatment. If you will need more treatment, you will be referred to a radiation oncologist and/or a medical oncologist.

 

Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

What to expect after surgery

After your surgery, you will be taken to the recovery room, where you will stay until you are awake and your condition and vital signs (blood pressure, pulse, and breathing) are stable.

How long you stay in the hospital depends on the surgery being performed, your overall state of health and whether you have any other medical problems, how well you do during surgery, and how you feel after surgery. Decisions about the length of your stay should be made by you and your doctor and not dictated by what your insurance will pay, but it is important to check your insurance coverage before surgery.

Often, men having a mastectomy and/or axillary lymph node dissection stay in the hospital overnight and then go home. However, it is becoming more common for the surgery to be done on an outpatient basis, with a short-stay in an observation unit before going home. Your doctor might arrange for a home care nurse to visit you at home to monitor your progress and provide care.

You will have a dressing (bandage) over the surgery site that may or may not snugly wrap around your chest. You may have one or more drains (plastic or rubber tubes) coming out from the breast or underarm area to remove blood and lymph fluid that collects during the healing process. Your health care team will teach you how to care for the drains, which may include emptying and measuring the fluid and identifying problems the doctor or nurse needs to know about. Most drains stay in place for 1 or 2 weeks. When drainage has decreased to about 30 cc (1 fluid ounce) each day, the drain will usually be removed.

Doctors rarely put the arm on the side of the surgery in a sling to hold it in place. Most doctors will want you to start moving that arm soon after surgery so that it won’t get stiff.

 

Written instructions after Surgery

 


Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

During Surgery

General anesthesia is usually given whenever the surgery is a mastectomy or an axillary node dissection, and is most often used during breast-conserving surgeries as well. You will have an IV (intravenous) line put in (usually into a vein in your arm), which the medical team will use to give medicines that may be needed during the surgery. Usually you will be hooked up to an electrocardiogram (EKG) machine and have a blood pressure cuff on your arm, so your heart rhythm and blood pressure can be checked during the surgery.

The length of the operation depends on the type of surgery being done. A mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection often takes from 2 to 3 hours.

 

What to expect after surgery

Written instructions after Surgery

 


Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Before Surgery

It is also a good idea to quit smoking before surgery. Using tobacco tightens (constricts) the blood vessels and reduces the supply of nutrients and oxygen to tissues. As with any surgery, smoking can delay healing. This can cause more noticeable scars and a longer recovery time. Patients who smoke also have a higher chance of the cancer coming back later.

 

During Surgery

What to expect after surgery

Written instructions after Surgery

 


Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Surgery Procedure for Male Breast Cancer

Surgery procedures are:

Before Surgery

During Surgery

What to expect after surgery

Written instructions after Surgery

 


 

Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Chronic pain after breast surgery

Some patients have problems with nerve (neuropathic) pain in the chest wall, armpit, and/or arm after surgery that doesn’t go away over time. This is called post-mastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS) because it was first described in women who had mastectomies, but it occurs after breast-conserving therapy, as well. Studies have shown that between 20% and 30% of women develop symptoms of PMPS after surgery. It isn’t clear how common this is in men after breast cancer surgery. The classic symptoms of PMPS are pain and tingling in the chest wall, armpit, and/or arm. Pain may also be felt in the shoulder or surgical scar. Other common complaints include numbness, shooting or pricking pain, or unbearable itching. Most patients with PMPS say that their symptoms are not severe.

PMPS is thought to be linked to damage done to the nerves in the armpit and chest during surgery. But the causes are not known. It seems to be more common in younger patients, those who had a full ALND (not just a SLNB), and those who were treated with radiation after surgery. Because ALNDs are done less often now, PMPS is less common than it once was.

It is important to tell your doctor if you are having any pain. PMPS can cause you to not use your arm the way you should and over time you could lose the ability to use it normally.

PMPS can be treated. Although opioids or narcotics are medicines commonly used to treat pain, they don’t always work well for nerve pain. But there are medicines and treatments that do work for this kind of pain. Be honest with your doctor if you are in pain to make sure you get the pain control you need.

 

Surgery Procedure for Male Breast Cancer

 


Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Possible side effects of lymph node surgery

As with other operations, pain, swelling, bleeding, and infection are possible.

The main possible long-term effect of removing axillary lymph nodes is lymphedema (swelling) of the arm. This occurs because any excess fluid in the arms normally travels back into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. Removing the lymph nodes sometimes blocks the drainage from the arm, causing this fluid to remain and build up.

You may also have short- or long-term limitations in moving your arm and shoulder after surgery. This is more common after an ALND than a SLNB. Your doctor may give you exercises to ensure that you do not have permanent problems with movement (a frozen shoulder). Numbness of the skin of the upper, inner arm is another common side effect because the nerve that controls sensation here travels through the lymph node area.

Some patients notice a rope-like structure that begins under the arm and can extend down toward the elbow. This, sometimes called axillary web syndrome or lymphatic cording, is more common after an ALND than SLNB. Symptoms may not appear for weeks or even months after surgery. It can cause pain and limit movement of the arm and shoulder. This often goes away without treatment, although some people seem to find physical therapy helpful.

 

Chronic pain after breast surgery

Surgery Procedure for Male Breast Cancer

 


Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Sentinel lymph node biopsy-SLNB

Although ALND is a safe operation and has low rates of most side effects, removing many lymph nodes increases the chance that the patient will have lymphedema after surgery (this is discussed below). To lower the risk of lymphedema, the doctors may use a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) procedure to check the lymph nodes for cancer. This procedure tells the doctor if cancer has spread to lymph nodes without removing as many of them first.

In this procedure the surgeon finds and removes the sentinel node (or nodes) — the first lymph node(s) into which a tumor drains, and the one(s) most likely to contain cancer cells if they have started to spread. To do this, the surgeon injects a radioactive substance and/or a blue dye into the area around the tumor, into the skin over the tumor, or into the tissues just under the areola (the colored area around the nipple). Lymphatic vessels will carry these substances into the sentinel node(s) over the next few hours. The doctor can use a special device to detect radioactivity in the nodes or can look for lymph nodes that have turned blue. (These are separate ways to find the sentinel node, but are often done together as a double check.) The doctor then makes an incision (cut) in the skin over the area in the armpit and removes the nodes. These nodes (often 2 or 3) are then looked at by the pathologist.

The lymph node can sometimes be checked for cancer during surgery. If cancer is found in the sentinel lymph node, the surgeon may go on to do a full ALND. If no cancer cells are seen in the lymph node at the time of the surgery, or if the sentinel node is not checked during surgery, the lymph node(s) will be examined more closely over the next several days. If cancer is found in the lymph node, the surgeon may recommend a full ALND at a later time.

Based on some recent studies in women, patients having breast-conserving surgery whose sentinel lymph nodes contain small amounts of cancer cells may be able to skip having a full ALND as long as they are going to have radiation. But because this hasn’t been studied well in patients who have had mastectomy, it isn’t clear that skipping the ALND would be safe for them. At this time, a full ALND is a standard part of the treatment for patients having a mastectomy who have a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy.

If there are no cancer cells in the sentinel node(s), it’s very unlikely that the cancer has spread to other lymph nodes, so no further lymph node surgery is needed. This lets you avoid some of the potential side effects of a full ALND.

A sentinel lymph node biopsy is not always appropriate. If an underarm lymph node looks large or abnormal by touch or by a test like ultrasound, it may be checked by fine needle aspiration. If cancer is found, a full ALND is recommended and a sentinel node biopsy is not needed.

Sentinel lymph node biopsy is a complex technique that requires a great deal of skill. It should only be done by a surgical team experienced with this technique. If you are thinking about having this type of biopsy, ask your health care team if this is something they do regularly.

 

Possible side effects of lymph node surgery

 


Chronic pain after breast surgery

Surgery Procedure for Male Breast Cancer


 

Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Axillary lymph node dissection-ALND

In this procedure, anywhere from about 10 to 40 (though usually less than 20) lymph nodes are removed from the axilla (the area under the arm) and checked for cancer spread. ALND is usually done at the same time as the mastectomy or lumpectomy, but it can be done in a second operation. This was once the most common way to check for breast cancer spread to nearby lymph nodes, and it is still done in some cases. For example, an ALND may be done if a previous biopsy such as a needle biopsy or sentinel lymph node biopsy (see below) has found cancer cells in one or more of the underarm lymph nodes.

 

Sentinel lymph node biopsy-SLNB

Possible side effects of lymph node surgery

 


Chronic pain after breast surgery

Surgery Procedure for Male Breast Cancer


 

Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

Lymph node surgery

To determine if the breast cancer has spread to axillary (underarm) lymph nodes, one or more of these lymph nodes may be removed and looked at under the microscope. This is an important part of staging and determining treatment and outcomes. When the lymph nodes are affected, there is an increased likelihood that cancer cells have spread through the bloodstream to other parts of the body.

 

Axillary lymph node dissection-ALND

Sentinel lymph node biopsy-SLNB

Possible side effects of lymph node surgery

 


Chronic pain after breast surgery

Surgery Procedure for Male Breast Cancer


 

Radiation therapy for breast cancer in men

Chemotherapy for breast cancer in men

Hormone therapy for breast cancer in men

Targeted therapy for breast cancer in men

Bone-directed therapy for breast cancer in men

 


 

Coping and support for male breast cancer

 


Related Topics

Benign breast conditions

General breast cancer terms

Types of breast cancer in men


References

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/breastcancerinmen/detailedguide/breast-cancer-in-men-what-is-breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/male_bc

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/type/rare-cancers/rare-cancers-name/breast-cancer-in-men

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/male-breast-cancer/basics/coping-support/con-20025972


 

 

Oncologists, Breast Surgeons are the specialists who deal with the breast cancer

728x90