728x90

Topics Under: Back Pain

Lab tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

The main blood test for ankylosing spondylitis is one to check for the HLA-B27 gene, which is present in the majority of Caucasians with ankylosing spondylitis. However, this test also has limitations. The gene is found in much lower percentages of African Americans with ankylosing spondylitis, and in ankylosing spondylitis patients from some Mediterranean countries. Also, the gene is found in many people who do not have ankylosing spondylitis, and will never get it. Still, when the gene is found in people who have symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis and/or x-ray evidence of ankylosing spondylitis, this finding helps support the ankylosing spondylitis diagnosis.

It is important to note that the HLA-B27 test is not a diagnostic test for ankylosing spondylitis.

Since there is no single blood test for AS, laboratory work may, or may not, be of help. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), also known as SED rate, and C-reactive protein (CRP) are common indicators of inflammation. Elevated levels of these markers, however, are not present in all AS patients and, when they are, it can be from other causes such as anemia, infection, or cancer. For example, it is estimated that less than 70 percent of people with AS have a raised ESR level.

Finally, there is no association between AS and rheumatoid factor (associated with rheumatoid arthritis) and antinuclear antibodies (associated with lupus.)

Urinalysis is often done to look for accompanying abnormalities of the kidney as well as to exclude kidney conditions that may produce back pain that mimics ankylosing spondylitis.

 

Previous

Symptoms evaluation for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Physical Exam for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Medical History for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Imaging tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

 

Related Topics

Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis Complications of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Causes of Ankylosing Spondylitis Prognosis for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis Future for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Doctor Consultation-Ankylosing Spondylitis Is there a cure for Ankylosing Spondylitis
Risk factors of Ankylosing Spondylitis Self Management and Home Remedies for Ankylosing Spondylitis

 


Reference:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ankylosing-spondylitis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20261138

https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Ankylosing_Spondylitis/#b

http://www.medicinenet.com/ankylosing_spondylitis/page4.htm#how_do_health_care_professionals_diagnose_ankylosing_spondylitis

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Ankylosing-spondylitis/Pages/Diagnosis.aspx

http://www.spondylitis.org/Ankylosing-Spondylitis/Diagnosis

 

Imaging tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Your rheumatologist will carry out imaging tests to examine the appearance of your spine and pelvis, as well as further blood tests.

These may include:

  • an X-ray
  • a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan
  • an ultrasound scan

X rays and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used in making or confirming a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, but these tests have limitations. X rays may show changes in the spine and sacroiliac joints that indicate ankylosing spondylitis; however, it may take years of inflammation to cause damage that is visible on x rays.

X-ray tests of the sacroiliac joints can demonstrate signs of inflammation and erosion of bone. X-rays of the spine can progressively demonstrate straightening, “squaring” of the vertebrae, and end-stage fusion of one vertebra to the next (ankylosis). Fusion up and down the spine can lead to a “bamboo spine” appearance on X-ray tests with complete loss of mobility.

MRI may allow for earlier diagnosis, because it can show damage to soft tissues and bone before it can be seen on an x ray. Both tests may also be used to monitor the progression of ankylosing spondylitis.

Although scans can sometimes show spinal inflammation and fusing of the spine (ankylosis), damage to the spine can’t always be picked up in the early stages of AS.

This is why diagnosis is often difficult. In many cases confirming a diagnosis is a long process that can take years.

A diagnosis of AS can usually be confirmed if an X-ray shows inflammation of the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis) and you have at least one of the following:

  • at least three months of lower back pain that gets better with exercise and doesn’t improve with rest
  • limited movement in your lower back (lumbar spine)
  • limited chest expansion compared with what is expected for your age and sex

If you have all three of these features but don’t have sacroiliitis – or if you only have sacroiliitis – you’ll be diagnosed with probable ankylosing spondylitis.

 

Previous

Symptoms evaluation for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Physical Exam for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Medical History for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

Next

Lab tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

 

Related Topics

Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis Complications of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Causes of Ankylosing Spondylitis Prognosis for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis Future for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Doctor Consultation-Ankylosing Spondylitis Is there a cure for Ankylosing Spondylitis
Risk factors of Ankylosing Spondylitis Self Management and Home Remedies for Ankylosing Spondylitis

 


Reference:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ankylosing-spondylitis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20261138

https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Ankylosing_Spondylitis/#b

http://www.medicinenet.com/ankylosing_spondylitis/page4.htm#how_do_health_care_professionals_diagnose_ankylosing_spondylitis

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Ankylosing-spondylitis/Pages/Diagnosis.aspx

http://www.spondylitis.org/Ankylosing-Spondylitis/Diagnosis

 

Medical History for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

The medical history involves answering questions, such as the following:

  • How long have you had pain?
  • Where specifically is the pain in your back or neck? Are other joints affected?
  • Is back pain better with exercise and worse after inactivity, such as when you first get up in the morning?
  • Do you have other problems, such as eye problems or fatigue?
  • Does anyone in your family have back problems or arthritis?
  • Have you recently suffered from a gastrointestinal illness?
  • Do you have any skin rashes such as psoriasis?

From your answers to these questions, your doctor can begin to get an idea of the diagnosis.

 

Previous

Symptoms evaluation for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Physical Exam for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

Next

Imaging tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Lab tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

 

Related Topics

Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis Complications of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Causes of Ankylosing Spondylitis Prognosis for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis Future for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Doctor Consultation-Ankylosing Spondylitis Is there a cure for Ankylosing Spondylitis
Risk factors of Ankylosing Spondylitis Self Management and Home Remedies for Ankylosing Spondylitis

 


Reference:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ankylosing-spondylitis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20261138

https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Ankylosing_Spondylitis/#b

http://www.medicinenet.com/ankylosing_spondylitis/page4.htm#how_do_health_care_professionals_diagnose_ankylosing_spondylitis

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Ankylosing-spondylitis/Pages/Diagnosis.aspx

http://www.spondylitis.org/Ankylosing-Spondylitis/Diagnosis

 

Physical Exam for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

During the physical exam, the doctor will look for signs and symptoms that are consistent with ankylosing spondylitis. These include pain along the spine and/or in the pelvis, sacroiliac joints, heels, and chest.  During the physical exam, your doctor might ask you to bend in different directions to test the range of motion in your spine. He or she might try to reproduce your pain by pressing on specific portions of your pelvis or by moving your legs into a particular position. Also, your doctor might ask you to take a deep breath to check for any problems with chest expansion, which could be caused by inflammation in the joints where the ribs attach to the spine. Severely affected people can have a stooped posture.

A physical examination entails looking for sites of inflammation. Other symptoms and indicators are also taken into account, including a history of iritis or uveitis (inflammation of the eye), Inflammation of the eyes can be evaluated by the doctor with an ophthalmoscope. A history of gastrointestinal infections (for example, the presence of Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis), and a family history of AS, as well as fatigue due to the presence of inflammation.

Previous

Symptoms evaluation for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

Next

Medical History for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Imaging tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Lab tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

 

Related Topics

Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis Complications of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Causes of Ankylosing Spondylitis Prognosis for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis Future for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Doctor Consultation-Ankylosing Spondylitis Is there a cure for Ankylosing Spondylitis
Risk factors of Ankylosing Spondylitis Self Management and Home Remedies for Ankylosing Spondylitis

 

 


Reference:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ankylosing-spondylitis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20261138

https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Ankylosing_Spondylitis/#b

http://www.medicinenet.com/ankylosing_spondylitis/page4.htm#how_do_health_care_professionals_diagnose_ankylosing_spondylitis

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Ankylosing-spondylitis/Pages/Diagnosis.aspx

http://www.spondylitis.org/Ankylosing-Spondylitis/Diagnosis

 

Symptoms evaluation for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

  • Onset is usually under 45 years of age.
  • Pain persists for more than three months (i.e., it is chronic).
  • Back pain and stiffness worsen with immobility, especially at night and early morning.
  • Back pain and stiffness tend to ease with physical activity and exercise.
  • limited movement in your lower back (lumbar spine)
  • limited chest expansion compared with what is expected for your age and sex

The first thing you should do if you think you have AS is to see your GP. They’ll ask about your symptoms, including:

  • what symptoms you’re experiencing
  • when they started
  • how long you’ve had them

Patients are also simultaneously evaluated for symptoms and signs of other related spondyloarthropathies, such as psoriasis, venereal disease, dysentery (reactive arthritis or Reiter’s disease), and inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease).

 

Next

Physical Exam for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Medical History for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Imaging tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

Lab tests for Ankylosing Spondylitis Diagnosis

 

 

Related Topics

Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis Complications of Ankylosing Spondylitis
Causes of Ankylosing Spondylitis Prognosis for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis Future for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis
Doctor Consultation-Ankylosing Spondylitis Is there a cure for Ankylosing Spondylitis
Risk factors of Ankylosing Spondylitis Self Management and Home Remedies for Ankylosing Spondylitis

 


 

Reference:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ankylosing-spondylitis/diagnosis-treatment/diagnosis/dxc-20261138

https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Ankylosing_Spondylitis/#b

http://www.medicinenet.com/ankylosing_spondylitis/page4.htm#how_do_health_care_professionals_diagnose_ankylosing_spondylitis

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Ankylosing-spondylitis/Pages/Diagnosis.aspx

http://www.spondylitis.org/Ankylosing-Spondylitis/Diagnosis

 

Doctor Consultation-Ankylosing Spondylitis

Is there a cure for Ankylosing Spondylitis

Future for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

Prognosis for patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

Complications of Ankylosing Spondylitis

728x90